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second amendment rights and the second amendment rights of our law-abiding law-ag citizens. we have seen the newtown parents here in washington bravely telling their stories. they deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of aurora deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of more than 30 people who die every single day at the hands of gun violence deserve more from this body. my friends, it is simply time to act. today is the day for this body to show the american people that their voices matter. that when 90% of americans demand us to expand background checks, that we can deliver. we should be able to agree today that we no longer need military-style weapons and ammunition clips on our streets. and we should be able to agree today that it's time to crack down on the illegal handguns being trafficked in our streets into the hands of criminals. four years ago, i met the parents of naisha pryor yard. naisha was a beautiful 17-year-old honor student killed in the prime of her life by an illegal handgun when she was just spending t
and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
and law enforcement officials for detecting the threat before it reached the capitol. they show the we put in place work. >> arizona reporter's office notified authorities after two envelopes arrived with a suspicious substance looked out. >> these envelopes appear suspicious. if they are. it may turn out there is nothing. but because of the events of the last several days we take it seriously with the resources that we have. >> hazardous mail is undergoing testing. the american postal worker's union complained they should have been told about the tainted letrs. they learned about it on the news report. >> bret: we are going to talk about the implication. a lot of people are concerned about personal security and national security. the day after the most devastating terrorist attacks on the u.s., september 12th, 2001. america changed security wise. it had changed forever and it had. the years passed by . largely without incident. until monday in boston when a terrorist struck again either foreign or domestic and not the scale of 9/11 but affecting public consciousness in similar ways. >> it
duval patrick. i assume he has been fully briefed on every step in this law enforcement investigation. >> the governor is getting briefings constantly from both the state police and boston police, the fbi. i know the mayor of boston was briefed this morning. i talked to the mayor after i had been told there was a breakthrough in the investigation and he wouldn't go that far but he did confirm it was the lord & taylor video. that his briefing from the boston police commissioner about what they called, other sources called a turning point. and he said they were making progress and he was hopeful that there would be a definitive breakthrough quite soon. that was where the mayor stopped. >> the governor will be here fairly soon. we'll talk to the governor as soon as he gets here. governor duval patrick. tom fuentes is the former fbi assistant director, a cnn analyst joining us right now. what are you hearing? you have good sources. what is the latest information you're getting ob the status, the state of this criminal investigation into these two bombings at the boston marathon that kille
states today. roughly half the people that buy them are current or former members of the military or law enforcement. they buy them for legitimate purposes-- primarily for target shooting and increasingly to go hunting. members of the united states senate and congress own those firearms. paul ryan, for example, owns one of those and goes hunting with them. >> ifill: that one was a forgone concliewrkz as were the magazine clips, but the background checks not so much. >> our concern with the universal background checks is we think the problem we see is you have to fix the nix system. the first thing you need to do is fix the nix system which is why our industry is funding an initiate toif work at the grass-roots level to work with the states falling down on the jobs and not getting the background checks-- getting the information into the background check system. the system is only as good as the information that's in it, and background checks that are incompleted and accurate don't help anybody. having more of those background checks that are incomplete also doesn't help anybody. >> ifill:
, a bill to restore states' sovereign rights to enforce state and local sales and use tax laws, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i ask for a second reading and object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be read for a second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair. >>> one day after the boston bombings a bipartisan watch group said the government used torture and illegal interrogation methods after the september 11 attacks in 2001. that report is next on c-span2. >>> she came into the white house, she was a 47-year-old lady that he did politics. she was deeply depressed at the death of her son and especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. she didn't have many friends unfortunately, but she did have a wonderful family there always seems to be somebody there and i don't think he did very much but she was a very intellectual woman,
and services and law firm income. if you want to encourage small business, we can work together. >> we cannot merthyr posted the code to try and alleviate pressure of taxes, but instead of having loopholes, why don't we have the raise? that way they decide for themselves what to do with capital, how to create jobs. there is where going to have an issue when it comes to tax reform. i don't want it well on this because i'm putting myself on the clock so we can get to everybody else here. has the president made any proposals since he's been president to raise taxes on families earning less than $200,000 for $250,000 for joint filers? >> the pledges prison and a pledge that it will not hit 50 below 250. another's disagreements on categorizing, but i'd be happy to have the conversation. >> i'm just trying to save the supreme court says the mandate is a task that obviously has everybody. including people making less than $250,000. the cigarette tax, smokers don't just make about $250,000. but the new 28% tax rate limitation on deductions kicks in families making $220,000. the point is your already
sometimes happens there are well-meaning people in law enforcement who may have information that isn't wholly vetted or accurate at the time and a well-meaning journal list runs with something they legitimately think is a good story. >> michael: let's talk about the story itself. what do we know at this time, brian? >> we don't know much. and that's why -- you know, i always find myself talking myself out of being on television, which is fine. we know the type of device. we know the location. we know that there's a lot of video and film that is going to be gone through, and it is really meticulous. i was at the oklahoma city bombing trial, and what struck me was the level of detail that officers went to trying to piece together evidence, and that sometimes appears to give you a false positive and oftentimes the media genuinely well intended will run with something when it is a red herring or incomplete. >> michael: let's talk about some of that then. they reportedly have video that they think shows the suspect, but they don't know who he is. how can investigato
that? >> my best case scenario, again, if i was in law enforcement at this time, i wouldn't tell anything to the media until i had my whole case put together. you're going to have one chance at this guy. you've got to make the best case you can. as soon as his name or address goes public, you know, the media hoards are going to descend on this whole thing. as an investigator, make your case, then let the media come in. >> what more do you need, you first then jim, than a picture of a guy or person dropping a black bag at the site of a bombing and then splitting? what more evidence would you need to make a case in court than that? >> well -- >> picture of a person. >> that's circumstantial evidence. unless we have a movie of him actually doing it, unless we know that black bag was actually it. you know, there's too many ways as you well know that you can be attacked in court for different reasons, suggesting his hand's really not on the bag and maybe somebody dropped it a second before he walked by. there's a lot to put together from the forensic side other than a picture where he
a primary vote. >> senator manchin called every nra talking point hogwash, laws. he was very strong. yet the hogwash and lies seem to be working. >> seem to be working because they always work. h is what the nra does. we knew this after newtown when, you know, all the energy bubbled up. folks were calling for an assault weapons ban and background checks and straw purchases and bills on trafficking, that the nra would somehow find a way to keep this from happening. the nra has been around a long time. the energy and passion we saw from december 14th has to continue. what happens today, what's happening in the senate right now, shouldn't be something that deters those newtown families and all those other families in cities across the country from pushing to get something done. this is a long haul process. this is not something that turns on, you know, one failed vote. >> isn't there a risk? one of the things that strikes me, we're talking about a vote on a watered down bill. progressives and people supporting the legislation have even said, is it really what we want? no. is it the best we
, methodical, careful and professional investigation. we've got every imaginable law enforcement agency at the federal, state, and local level. they are working very, very well together under the leadership of the fbi. it is going to take time. it's a several block crime scene and it's being combed sort of a quarter inch by quarter inch. it's going to be a slow investigation but i think as every hour and day passes, they make progress. >> what do you think is the attitude? you would know it as well as anyone up there, the attitude of the boston people and the massachusetts people about this? do they just feel that they are victims, something bad happened? or is there a sense of anger, if you will, that somebody would do this or a group of would do this? >> well, i think it's a mixture of all of that and more. i think certainly people are shocked, shaken in many, many cases shattered that something like this could happen at a civic ritual like the marathon of which we are so proud and on patriots day, there's frustration that the perpetrators haven't been found but i think people should
? maybe they want to hold back their information. what's going on behind the scenes with law enforcement? >> i think there may be some late-breaking developments in terms of if they have a specific suspect, which it sounded like they did earlier. perhaps they weren't ready to make a move or statement on it. we don't know if there is one or two persons involved in this. they have received 2,000 images that they are currently analyzing from the public based on the public plea they made yesterday. there is a lot of rich forensic information to go through. you had all those people out there crime scene investigators capturing things supposed to be moments from family members that turned into this tragedy. the fact that they were able to recover so much of this bomb as well is going to be very helpful. they will be able to identify through specific markers exactly where every piece of that bomb came from. just by doing that they are able to narrow in on suspect or suspects. they can also use the footage that was seen of the individual, match that together i wouldn't be surprised if we heard s
strong show of force, but law enforcement officials say that there are no unexploded devices across the city. there were just those two planted bombs. people are still on edge, but it's not quite the police presence that we saw yesterday. >> all right, tahman bradley in boston, thank you. >> and, you know, tahman just briefly touched on the investigation into those bombings. >> yeah, of particular interest this morning is what's left of that common pressure cooker. that's where abc's brian ross continues our coverage. >> reporter: this is what remains of the pressure cooker turned into a homemade bomb seen in this fbi crime lab photo obtained by abc news. it was hidden in a black backpack. the simple bombs were responsible for 12 seconds of horror. cell phone footage shot by a spectator between the two explosions. authorities are going through race day videos frame by frame. here the white smoke seen after the detonation indicates a bomb built with low velocity explosive mixtures, not the more powerful military grade. >> they may not have had the resources as we've seen in other bom
, law enforcement officials are keeping a very close eye on the internet, specifically sites that show people how to make destructive devices. nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers has that part of the story, good morning. >> matt, good morning to you. regardless of who committed this atrocity it's clear these days that anyone with a grievance and the will can learn how to become a terrorist simply by going online. now authorities are trying to use some of these sites to their advantage. the latest evidence bomb makers have taken their teachings to the web this online al qaeda publication posted last month, a guide to carrying out terror attacks including detailed illustrated recipes for pressure cooker bombs, the kind investigators say was used in boston. >> the internet has brought terrorism to the web. it's made it go viral. anybody can look online and find out how to make a bomb. it is a frightening development. >> a similar terrorist manual, how to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom, was posted three years ago. prosecutors say it was used by this former muslim-am
police officer woke up the next day a criminal. because the new law wasn't written to exclude police officers. it was a laughably bad piece of legislation. >> john: incredibly popular one as well. >> well, you know. what does that say? >> john: let me bring dean in. you're a muslim. i don't know if i can trust you yet. those on the right tried to politicize -- i can only imagine what kind of day it was for you yesterday emotionally because i was reading the same twitter you were. a lot of our friends on the right tried to politicize the attack. >> one in particular. >> john: there was a lot of embarrassing stuff out there. based on a "new york post" very early report that a saudi national was the suspect steve king of iowa said... >> john: laura ingraham and others echoed the need to look at immigration. it remains absolutely zero evidence this act was perpetrated by anyone from another country. isn't this the same kind of an exploitation to advance a completely separate political agenda? >> it is. steve king is a jackass. i don't like him or louie gohmert, all of the right wing -- >
and the district of columbia that do not recognize some form of conceal gun carry law. in other words, it is part of the public policy of 49 states that conceal handgun licenses may be obtained by lawful owners. our amendment would allow persons with concealed handgun permits to carry those weapons as they travel between jurisdictions and not -- and avoid any sort of prosecution. this does not create a national standard. it does not apply to jurisdictions that don't otherwise recognize the right to conceal carry. and it would act, in effect, like a driver's license so you don't have to get a separate driver's license in each state that you travel through. and for those who believe background checks that are important, this is background checks on steroids. i'd ask my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. schumer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: yeah, this amendment would wreak havoc in large portions of america, suburban and urban areas. now, the bottom line is very simple. wyoming, maybe concealed carry works. every police officer in america -- a
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